what's left

New York Times reporter arrested in Zimbabwe

with 2 comments

By Stephen Gowans

On March 27, I wrote about how the US state, media and NGOs were collaborating to shape public opinion on Zimbabwe’s March 29 elections.

The article centered on a March 26 New York Times report by Barry Bearak, titled “Hope and Fear for Zimbabwe’s Vote.”

Bearak’s reporting was confined to interviewing representatives of so called “non-governmental” election monitoring groups that, far from being “non-governmental”, are funded by the US government.

Not surprisingly, the misrepresented “non-government” voices Bearak featured in his article aped the line of the US government.

Bearak was arrested in Harare on April 3. He was in the country as a journalist without accreditation.

While Bearak’s arrest has been condemned as inexcusable repression, the New York Times reporter is part of a propaganda apparatus integrated into US regime change efforts in Zimbabwe.

In 1977, Carl Bernstein showed how the US media had worked hand in glove with the CIA. Foreign correspondents, including those of the New York Times, acted on behalf of the US intelligence agency while on assignment abroad.

While Bearak may or may not have been acting on behalf of the CIA, there are sufficient grounds for authorities in Zimbabwe (or for anyone else for that matter) to suspect he was.

Even if Bearak is free from CIA-connections, he was not in Zimbabwe as a neutral observer but as an active participant in efforts to oust the Mugabe government and its program of investing Zimbabwe’s liberation with real content.

Overthrowing Mugabe’s Zanu-PF party’s program will clear the way for the reversal of the agrarian reforms and will block further efforts to put the country’s economy in the hands of the black majority.

Bearak’s arrest should be considered neither surprising nor indefensible.

For the latest foundation-sponsored Patrick Bond spin on Zimbabwe, check out Pambazuka News, brought to you by The Ford Foundation and George Soros as well as Fahamu, i.e., the US Congress-funded Media Institute of Southern Africa, the European Union, and, oh yes, the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

Written by what's left

April 4, 2008 at 4:39 pm

Posted in Zimbabwe

2 Responses

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  1. “Bearak’s reporting was confined to interviewing representatives of so called “non-governmental” election monitoring groups that, far from being “non-governmental”, are funded by the US government.”

    Pot calling the kettle black? Let us ignore the apparent apathy that the Bush administration have for the so-called mainstream media on the assumption that you have been living under a rock for a while. Haave you ever noticed how much you sound like a mouthpiece for Zanu PF?

    “Bearak was arrested in Harare on April 3. He was in the country as a journalist without accreditation.”

    Thats just rhetorical and you know it. Even if Bearak was a blogger with a private blog that had no afifliation to a newspaper, he would have been booted. By the way I noticed you got published in the state run The Herald. Does that make you a journalist without accreditation in Canada?

    “While Bearak’s arrest has been condemned as inexcusable repression, the New York Times reporter is part of a propaganda apparatus integrated into US regime change efforts in Zimbabwe.”

    And you re a part of the propaganda apparatus set up by the Zimbabwean government to defend its appalling handling of the country and its economy. It works both ways.

    “While Bearak may or may not have been acting on behalf of the CIA, there are sufficient grounds for authorities in Zimbabwe (or for anyone else for that matter) to suspect he was.”

    Yes, and I believe you are working for Mugabes intelligence service.

    ” Even if Bearak is free from CIA-connections, he was not in Zimbabwe as a neutral observer but as an active participant in efforts to oust the Mugabe government and its program of investing Zimbabwe’s liberation with real content.”

    And YOU are ACTIVELY SUPPORTING REPRESSEIVE MEASURES in a country that believes in freedom of speech. If you were thrown in jail here you would be guaranteed access to a better legal system than that joke that they have instituted in Zimbabwe. Hell, on the basis of your being anti-freedom of speech, I think anyone in Canada can make a case for you to be thrown into jail for not supporting Canadian values. Of course Canadian law is too fair for that to happen. Zimbabwean law on the other hand…

    “Bearak’s arrest should be considered neither surprising nor indefensible.”

    And your defence of this kind of repression is indefensible in my country. Get out of Canada Mr Gowans. Go back to your dreamland ZImbabwe. Being a Canadian is accepting that all individuals have certain rights. If you cannot accept that, then you are not entitled to the citizenship of this country. Go on. Go home.

    canadian

    April 6, 2008 at 12:10 am

  2. Canuck,

    I gather that in the clash between the freedom of foreign reporters to act as agents of a hostile imperialist government and the rights of Zimbabweans to own their own land and resources and to be free from foreign domination, you come down on the side of the former rather than latter. Okay, you’ve chosen your side. I’ve chosen mine.

    Steve

    Stephen Gowans

    April 6, 2008 at 10:55 pm


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